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Research Article |

Factors Associated with Screening of Spouses of HIV-Positive Pregnant Women in Three Prenatal Consultation Centers in Bangui

Introduction: Approximately1.5 million children aged 0-14 are infected with HIV worldwide. Most of these children acquired HIV through mother-to-child transmission. One of the barriers to eliminating mother-to-child transmission of HIV is fear of reactions from partners of pregnant women to HIV testing and sharing of results. To optimize partner testing of pregnant women who test positive for HIV, WHO has recommended HIV partner notification services. It isIn this context, our study aims to determine the proportion of spouses of HIV-positive pregnant women who tested themselves after notification of their partner's HIV status and to identify the factors associated with this screening. Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study with descriptive and analytical aims. The study populationEast constitutedpregnant women living with HIV followed in the three ANC centers. AllThe HIV-positive pregnant woman meeting the inclusion criteria and seen in consultation during the study period was retained. Women are recruited during their visit to the CPN center. Data were entered and analyzed using Epi info version software. Results: We recorded a total of 182 HIV-positive women during the study period. Their age varied between 17 and 43 years with an average of 28 years (± 6). The majority of women (53.8%) and spouses (58.2%) have reached secondary school level. Around 65.9% of spouses were informed of their partner's HIV status. Among the 120 spouses who were informed of their partner's HIV status, 70% agreed to be tested and 30% refused the test. Around 65.9% of spouses were informed of their partner's HIV status. Notification was made in 51.7% of cases by the women themselves (passive notification), in 10% of cases by women through a written notification letter by a health provider and in 38.3% of cases by health personnel after the woman's consent (assisted notification). Factors associated with spousal screening in multivariate analysis were spousal age and type of notification. Conclusion: Many challenges remain to be overcome, in particular the poor access of pregnant women to prenatal consultations and the fight against stigmatization which constitute a barrier to the screening service. A combination of approaches such as partner notification and self-testing could be tried to improve the participation of spouses in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

Joint, Screening, HIV, Infected Pregnant Women, Bangui

APA Style

Saint Calvaire Henri, D., Jean de Dieu, L., Sylvain Honore, W., Rodrigue Herman, D., Emmanuel, F., et al. (2023). Factors Associated with Screening of Spouses of HIV-Positive Pregnant Women in Three Prenatal Consultation Centers in Bangui. Science Journal of Public Health, 11(6), 206-210. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.sjph.20231106.13

ACS Style

Saint Calvaire Henri, D.; Jean de Dieu, L.; Sylvain Honore, W.; Rodrigue Herman, D.; Emmanuel, F., et al. Factors Associated with Screening of Spouses of HIV-Positive Pregnant Women in Three Prenatal Consultation Centers in Bangui. Sci. J. Public Health 2023, 11(6), 206-210. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20231106.13

AMA Style

Saint Calvaire Henri D, Jean de Dieu L, Sylvain Honore W, Rodrigue Herman D, Emmanuel F, et al. Factors Associated with Screening of Spouses of HIV-Positive Pregnant Women in Three Prenatal Consultation Centers in Bangui. Sci J Public Health. 2023;11(6):206-210. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20231106.13

Copyright © 2023 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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