Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Page: 569-576
Studies on Prevalence, Co-Infection and Associated Risk Factors of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Benue State, Nigeria
Emmanuel Msugh Mbaawuaga, Department of Biological Sciences, Benue State University Makurdi, Nigeria
Christian Ukuoma Iroegbu, Department of Biological Sciences, Cross River University of Technology Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria
Anthony Chibuogwu Ike, Department of Microbiology, University of Nigeria Nsukka, Nigeria
Godwin Terver Aondohemba Jombo, Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Health Sciences, Benue State University Makurdi, Nigeria
Received: Oct. 16, 2014;       Accepted: Oct. 31, 2014;       Published: Nov. 20, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjph.20140206.21      View  2629      Downloads  302
Abstract
The Benue State of Nigeria is one of the regions in sub-Saharan Africa facing rising morbidity and mortality, among adult individuals, from HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. This study was to determine the prevalence of HBV and HIV singly and concomitantly and to determine the influence of some risk factors on the spread of HBV and HIV in some study groups in Benue State. A total of 1535 serum samples was drawn randomly from consented volunteered participants and analyzed by ELISA for HBsAg. Antibodies to HIV 1 and 2 were detected in sera using Determine and HIV1/2 Stat Pak test strips. One hundred and eighty four (12.0%) had HBV current infection, 244 (15.9%) had HIV but 42 (2.7%) had both HBV and HIV infections. The two infections were strongly associated with each other (P=0.006) and each infection had a significant relationship with the groups studied (P=0.001 and P=0.000 for HBV and HIV respectively). Our study identifies the drivers of HIV infection in Benue State to include, being a divorcee/having a separated marriage (P=0.000), Alcoholism (P=0.007), smoking (P=0.000), blood transfusion (P=0.000) or surgery (P=0.001). Awareness of the occurrence of HIV infection was inversely associated (P=0.000) with the prevalence of HIV infection in the study area. Hence, there is need to upgrade the status of medical facilities especially in rural hospitals as well as the personnel towards safer blood transfusions. In addition, programmes targeting behavioural change should not be restricted to major town but should reach the hinterlands.
Keywords
HBV, HIV, Co-Infections, Risk Factors, Benue State, Nigeria
To cite this article
Emmanuel Msugh Mbaawuaga, Christian Ukuoma Iroegbu, Anthony Chibuogwu Ike, Godwin Terver Aondohemba Jombo, Studies on Prevalence, Co-Infection and Associated Risk Factors of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Benue State, Nigeria, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 569-576. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20140206.21
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