Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2015, Page: 752-756
Cultural Malpractices During Pregnancy, Child Birth and Postnatal Period Among Women of Child Bearing Age in Limmu Genet Town, Southwest Ethiopia
Tadesse Nigussie Tola, Department of Public health, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan, Ethiopia
Andualem Henok Tadesse, Department of Public health, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan, Ethiopia
Received: Jul. 30, 2015;       Accepted: Aug. 10, 2015;       Published: Aug. 21, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjph.20150305.32      View  5863      Downloads  193
Abstract
Back ground: Everyday, at least 800 women die worldwide from the complications of pregnancy & child birth, 90% of which occurring in Asia & Sub Saharan Africa. These shows, maternal death in developing country is high. One of the contributing factors for these problems is cultural malpractices during pregnancy and child birth. The actual incidence of cultural malpractices in developing countries accounts at about 5-15% of maternal deaths. Objective: To assess prevalence and factors associated with cultural malpractice practiced during pregnancy, child birth and postnatal period among women of child bearing age in Limmu Genet town, Southwest Ethiopia. Methods: Community based cross sectional study was conducted to determine prevalence and factors associated with cultural malpractices that take place during pregnancy, child birth and postnatal period among women of the reproductive age group. The study was conducted from June to September 2014. Data was collected by using interviewer administered pretested questionnaire by trained high school students. The collected data was entered to Epidata 3.1 and transported to SPSS version 17 for data analysis. Data was presented by using tables and graphs. The association between variables was tested by using X2 test with a p-value of less than 0.05 was used to declare the significance of the association. Result: Out of 303 women 58(19.1%) practiced nutritional taboo, 67(22%) women practiced abdominal massage and 116(38.3%) delivered their babies at home, 33(28.4%) washed their babies immediately after birth and 26(22.41%) did not give collostrum to new born. Educational status was significantly associated with nutritional taboo, abdominal massage, home delivery and avoiding colostrum feeding to new born. Conclusion: The prevalence of cultural malpractices during pregnancy, delivery and postpartum in the study area was high. Therefore health education and promoting formal female education are important to decrease or avoid these cultural malpractices.
Keywords
Cultural Malpractice, Pregnancy, Labour, Postpartum, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Tadesse Nigussie Tola, Andualem Henok Tadesse, Cultural Malpractices During Pregnancy, Child Birth and Postnatal Period Among Women of Child Bearing Age in Limmu Genet Town, Southwest Ethiopia, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2015, pp. 752-756. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20150305.32
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