Volume 6, Issue 1, January 2018, Page: 6-14
Correlates of Unintended Pregnancies in Ivory Coast: Results from a National Survey
Kpebo Djoukou Olga Denise, National Institute of Public Health, Abidjan, Ivory Coast ; Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Medical School, University Félix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Aké-Tano Sassor Odile Purifine, National Institute of Public Health, Abidjan, Ivory Coast ; Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Medical School, University Félix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Aka Joseph, National Institute of Public Health, Abidjan, Ivory Coast ; Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Medical School, University Félix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Konan Yao Eugène, National Institute of Public Health, Abidjan, Ivory Coast ; Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Medical School, University Félix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Attoh-Touré Harvey, Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Medical School, University Félix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast; National Institute of Public Hygiene, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Tetchi Ekissi Orsot, National Institute of Public Health, Abidjan, Ivory Coast ; Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Medical School, University Félix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Dagnan N’Cho Simplice, Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Medical School, University Félix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast; National Institute of Public Hygiene, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Received: Sep. 27, 2017;       Accepted: Oct. 19, 2017;       Published: Dec. 5, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjph.20180601.12      View  942      Downloads  52
Abstract
As in most of Africa, unintended pregnancy remains a major reproductive health challenge in Ivory Coast. The 3 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) conducted in the country in 1994, 1999, and 2012, revealed a decreasing trend in the percentage of unwanted pregnancies: 7.8%, 4.9%, 3.3% in 1994, 1999, and 2012 respectively. However, the percentage of births that were wanted later remained regularly high, around 20% with a pic on 23.8% in 1999. Understanding the extent of unintended pregnancy and the factors associated is crucial to conduct evidence-based interventions and avoiding women’s resort to unsafe abortions. A secondary analysis of the DHS 2011-2012 of Ivory Coast allowed to include 1032 pregnant women at the time of data collection. A bivariate analysis and multivariate was conducted with Stata 14.0 for identifying associated factors with unintended pregnancy. In total, 26.4% of the pregnancies were unintended. Age was not found as a correlate of unintended pregnancy. Women in primary and secondary education categories were more likely to have unintended pregnancy as compared to the no education category (OR (95%CI): 2.0 (1.3-3.1) and 2.1 (1.1-4.0) respectively). Ever use of family planning, high parity (5 children and more), and one as well as two and more deliveries in the past five years were associated with unintended pregnancy (OR (95%CI): 2.1 (1.4-3.2), 3.5 (1.2-10.2) and 2.8 (1.5-5.5), respectively). Partner’s desire for less children was also found to be associated with unintended pregnancy (OR (95% CI): 1.9 (1.1-3.1)). Women already burdened with higher fertility were suffering from unintended pregnancy. Efforts to increase the use of family planning services among these women should be strengthened.
Keywords
Unintended Pregnancies, Family Planning, Associated Factors, Ivory Coast
To cite this article
Kpebo Djoukou Olga Denise, Aké-Tano Sassor Odile Purifine, Aka Joseph, Konan Yao Eugène, Attoh-Touré Harvey, Tetchi Ekissi Orsot, Dagnan N’Cho Simplice, Correlates of Unintended Pregnancies in Ivory Coast: Results from a National Survey, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2018, pp. 6-14. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20180601.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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