Volume 6, Issue 5, September 2018, Page: 127-132
Assessment of Bicycle Use Among Residents in Affordable Housing in New York City
Sadie Sanchez, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
Erin Thanik, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
Ganga Bey, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
Demetrios Papazaharias, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
Lynn Onyebeke, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
Jessica Oh, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
Moses Syldort, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
Sarah Wolf, Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention and Tobacco Control, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, USA
Elizabeth Garland, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
Received: Sep. 12, 2018;       Accepted: Oct. 4, 2018;       Published: Nov. 7, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjph.20180605.12      View  103      Downloads  1
Abstract
Inadequate physical activity is associated with an increased risk of obesity. But most U.S. adults do not meet the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for physical activity. Active transportation, such as bicycling to a destination, is associated with increased physical activity levels, but little research has been conducted regarding bicycle use in urban environments like New York City (NYC). A cross-sectional, self-administered survey was given to residents of two low-income neighborhoods in NYC to determine the prevalence of bicycle ownership and usage, and to assess potential community improvements to increase bicycle use. More than 80% of the 119 participants endorsed knowing how to ride a bicycle and nearly half of all participants reported that they or someone in their household own a bicycle. Of those who own a bicycle, the vast majority stored it in their apartment. More participants with a bicycle in their household reported better health status and moderate to high activity levels than those without a bicycle in their household. Those with a bicycle in their household were significantly more likely than those without a bicycle in their household to have used it for work or leisure in the last 30 days. The most commonly reported reason for not bicycling more frequently was lack of safe and secure designated bicycle storage areas in their apartment buildings. Other commonly reported reasons for not bicycling more frequently included perceived crime and lack of traffic safety. Participants suggested that clearly marked bicycle lanes and car-free bicycle paths may increase bicycle use in their neighborhoods.
Keywords
Active Transportation, Physical Activity, Bicycle Use, Built Environment, Bicycle Storage, Community Improvements, Active Design
To cite this article
Sadie Sanchez, Erin Thanik, Ganga Bey, Demetrios Papazaharias, Lynn Onyebeke, Jessica Oh, Moses Syldort, Sarah Wolf, Elizabeth Garland, Assessment of Bicycle Use Among Residents in Affordable Housing in New York City, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 6, No. 5, 2018, pp. 127-132. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20180605.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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