Volume 3, Issue 5-1, September 2015, Page: 25-28
Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites Among Primary School Children in Three Geopolitical Zones of Imo State, Nigeria
Udensi Justina Ugochi, Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Mgbemena Ifenyinwa C., Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Emeka-Nwabunnia Ijeoma, Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Ugochukwu Mmasi Godson, Biology Department, Alvan Ikoku Federal University of Education, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Awurum Ivy Nwaku, Biology Department, Alvan Ikoku Federal University of Education, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Received: Jun. 13, 2015;       Accepted: Sep. 13, 2015;       Published: Oct. 27, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjph.s.2015030501.15      View  6218      Downloads  151
Abstract
A study of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was conducted among children aged 5-16years in primary schools in rural parts of Imo State, Nigeria. Of the 337 faecal samples examined, 164 (48. 7%) harboured intestinal parasites with 65 (40. 4%) being from Orlu zone, 57 (52. 7%) from Owerri zone, and 42 (61. 8%) from Okigwe zone. The parasites identified were Ascaris lumbricoides (41. 5%), Hookworm (23. 8%), Trichuris trichiura (1. 2%), Teania spp (1. 2%), Entamoeba histolytica (36. 6%), and Giardia lamblia (1. 8%). Among the helminthes, A. lumbricoides (60. 0%) occurred highest among the age bracket of 14-16years, while E. histolytica (44. 4%) was the highest occurring protozoan parasite among children aged 5-7 years. Generally, prevalence of infection decreased with increasing age of children, and more females (53. 9%) than males (48. 1%) were infected. However, there was no statistical significant difference in infection with relation to age and sex of the pupils (p>0. 05). Intestinal parasitic infection is reduced through improved personal hygiene and environmental sanitation as children with high standard of hygiene were found to be less prone to parasitic infection.
Keywords
Prevalence, Intestinal Parasites, Children, Infection, Geopolitical Zones
To cite this article
Udensi Justina Ugochi, Mgbemena Ifenyinwa C., Emeka-Nwabunnia Ijeoma, Ugochukwu Mmasi Godson, Awurum Ivy Nwaku, Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites Among Primary School Children in Three Geopolitical Zones of Imo State, Nigeria, Science Journal of Public Health. Special Issue: Who Is Afraid of the Microbes. Vol. 3, No. 5-1, 2015, pp. 25-28. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.s.2015030501.15
Reference
[1]
D. R. Arora, and B. A. Brij, “Medical Parasitology,” 3rd ed., CBS Publishers and Distributors, 2012, pp. ix-x, 3-6. 233-245.
[2]
Y. Gutierrez, “Diagnostic Pathology of Parasitic Infections with Clinical Correlations,” 2nd ed., Oxford University Press, 2005, pp. 354-366.
[3]
WHO, “Report on Intestinal Helminths Infection in World Health Organization,” Technical Report Series: 2002, vol. 789: 345-356.
[4]
J. I. Mbanugo, and O. C. Abaziri, “A Comparative Study of Intestinal Infection of Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Woman in Nkpor, Anambra State, Nigeria,” Nigeria Journal of Parasitology, 2002, vol. 23: 19-26.
[5]
J. U. Udensi, and F. N. Opara, “Waste to Wealth: An Approach to Environmental Waste Management,” International Journal of Environmental Health and Human Development, 2011, vol. 12, pp. 66-70.
[6]
M. Cheesbrough, “Intestinal Nematodes: In District Laboratory Practices in Tropical Countries,” Part 1 (Low Price edition). Cambridge University Press: New York, 2006, pp. 182-215.
[7]
WHO, “Training Manual on Diagnosis of Intestinal Parasites,” Geneva. 2007, http: //www. who. int/wormcontrol/documents/ bench aids/training-manual/e
[8]
L. Gracia, “Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology,” American Society for Microbiology, 2009, pp. 246-247.
[9]
F. N. Opara, and B. E. B. Nwoke, “Research Technique in Biological and chemical Science: Techniques in Parasitology,” Springfield Publishers Ltd, Nigeria, 2003, pp. 190-191.
[10]
O. A. Adeyeba and A. M. Akinlabi, “Intestinal Parasitic Infections Among School Children in a Rural Community, South West Nigeria,” Nigerian Journal of Parasitology, 2002, vol. 23, pp. 11-18.
[11]
J. I. Mbanugo, and C. J. Onyebuchi, “Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites in Ezinifite Community, Aguata L. G. A. Anambra State,” Nigeria Journal of Parasitology, 2002, vol. 23, pp. 27-84.
[12]
O. M. Ukpai and C. D. Ugwu, “Prevalence of Gastrointestinal Tract Parasites in Primary School Children in Ikwuano L. G. A. Abia State, Nigeria,” Nigeria Journal of Parasitology, 2003, vol. 25, pp. 129-136.
[13]
N. A. Agwu, “Incidence of Intestinal Helminths in School Children in Aba urban city, Abia State, Nigeria”. International Journal of Environmental Health and Human Development, 2001, vol. 2, pp. 47-52.
[14]
I. O. Emmy-Igbe, E. O. Ekwesianya, C. N. Ukaga, C. I. Eneanyi, and C. M. Ajaero, “Prevalence of Intestinal helminths in Students of Ihiala L. G. A of Anambra State”. Parasitology, 2011, vol. 3, pp. 247-249.
[15]
S. O. Sam-Wobo, C. F. Mafiana, and A. B. Idowu, “Re-infection Patterns of Ascaris Among School and Children in Ogun State, Nigeria,” Nigerian Journal of Paraitology, 2004, vol. 25, pp. 7-14.
[16]
R. M. Mordi and O. Paul, “A Study of Blood and Gastro-intestinal Parasites in Edo State,” African Journal of Biochemistry, 2007, vol. 6, pp. 2201-2207.
[17]
J. Bethany, S. Brooker, M. Albinico, L. A. Geiger, D. Deitmert, and P. J. Hotez, “Soil Transmitted Helminths Infection Ascariasis, Trichiuriasis and Hookworm,” Lancet, 2006, vol. 367, pp. 21-32.
[18]
G. C. Cook, C. Gordon, G. Zumba, and I. Alimuddin, “Manson’s Tropical Disease,” Saunder Elsevier: United Kingdom, 2009, vol. 9, pp. 9917-9965.
[19]
S. Brooker, A. Clements, and D. A. P. Bundy, “Global Epidemiology, Ecology and Control of Intestinal Helminthic Infections,” Advanced Parasitology, 2006, vol. 62, pp. 223-265.
[20]
J. A. Harp, “Parasitic Infection of the Gastro-intestinal Tract,” Current Opinion in Gastroenterol. Clinic, North America, 2003, vol. 30, pp. 797-815.
[21]
H. J. Marguire, “Disease Due to Helminth, Principle and Practice of Infectious Diseases,” 6th ed., Elsevier Publisher: India, 2005, pp. 258-286.
[22]
P. J. Hotex, “A plan to Defect Neglected Tropical Diseases,” Science Am, 2010, vol. 302, pp. 90-96.
[23]
I. H. Nock, D. Dumiya, and M. Galadima, “Geo-helminthes in Soil and Stool of Pupils of Some Primary Schools in Samaru, Zaria, Nigeria,” Nigeria Journal of Parasitology, 2003, vol. 24, pp. 115-122.
[24]
I. E. K. Mba, and A. N. Amadi, “Helminth Infection in school children in Aba, Abia State, Nigeria,” Journal of Medical Investment Practice, 2001, vol. 2, pp. 43- 45.
Browse journals by subject